Books, Reviews

REVIEW | Falling in Love with Hominids (ARC)

REVIEW | Falling in Love with Hominids (ARC)Falling in Love with Hominids by Nalo Hopkinson
Published by Tachyon Publications on August 11th 2015
Genre: Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Short Stories
222 pages
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads page

Summary from Goodreads:

Nalo Hopkinson (Brown Girl in the Ring, Skin Folk) has been widely hailed as a highly significant voice in Caribbean and American fiction. She has been dubbed “one of our most important writers,” (Junot Diaz), with “an imagination that most of us would kill for” (Los Angeles Times), and her work has been called “stunning,” (New York Times) “rich in voice, humor, and dazzling imagery” (Kirkus), and “simply triumphant” (Dorothy Allison).

Falling in Love with Hominids presents over a dozen years of Hopkinson’s new, uncollected fiction, much of which has been unavailable in print. Her singular, vivid tales, which mix the modern with Afro-Carribean folklore, are occupied by creatures unpredictable and strange: chickens that breathe fire, adults who eat children, and spirits that haunt shopping malls.

REVIEW | Falling in Love with Hominids (ARC)Falling in Love with Hominids by Nalo Hopkinson
Published by Tachyon Publications on August 11th 2015
Genre: Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Short Stories
222 pages
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads page



Summary from Goodreads:

Nalo Hopkinson (Brown Girl in the Ring, Skin Folk) has been widely hailed as a highly significant voice in Caribbean and American fiction. She has been dubbed “one of our most important writers,” (Junot Diaz), with “an imagination that most of us would kill for” (Los Angeles Times), and her work has been called “stunning,” (New York Times) “rich in voice, humor, and dazzling imagery” (Kirkus), and “simply triumphant” (Dorothy Allison).

Falling in Love with Hominids presents over a dozen years of Hopkinson’s new, uncollected fiction, much of which has been unavailable in print More hints. Her singular, vivid tales, which mix the modern with Afro-Carribean folklore, are occupied by creatures unpredictable and strange: chickens that breathe fire, adults who eat children, and spirits that haunt shopping malls.

If you’re looking for a series of fantastical stories with a diverse cast of characters, Falling in Love with Hominids might be right up your alley! Most characters were ethnically diverse and/or LGBT; the stories delve into mythological fare ranging from Shakespeare to Caribbean lore.

Like any short story collection, there were some hits and misses among these 18 stories. A few felt half-finished, like character studies that still needed expansion. Still others were so strange that they seemed beyond my comprehension. But Hopkinson’s hits are REALLY hits!

Stories I liked:
  • The Easthound: In a vaguely post-apocalyptic future, children survive in fear of a transformation called “sprouting.”
  • Soul Case: A colony of former Afro-Caribbean slaves uses magic to defend against their ex-“owners”.
  • The Smile on the Face: In a twist on the old urban legend about swallowing fruit seeds and growing plants in your stomach, a teenage girl goes to a house party and faces an unexpected transformation.
  • Old Habits: Ghosts trapped in a mall long for life.
Stories I LOVED:
  • Message in a Bottle: An artist has a bizarre encounter with his friend’s unsettling child. This one has a dash of science fiction; there’s talk about speciesism, art, legacy, and the incomprehensible world of the future.
  • Left Foot, Right: A teenage girl, wearing a single high-heeled shoe, visits a river. I remember feeling viscerally stunned when I figured out what this story was actually about. (Sorry to be cryptic! It’s tough to summarize these stories without spoilers.)

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

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1 Comment

  • Reply Alyssa @ The Devil Orders Takeout December 19, 2015 at 5:59 am

    Ooooh this sounds really fascinating. I’ve not read much literature from the region, but the stories sound really cool — especially the girl with the one shoe. I’m not much into short story collections, but perhaps I will check this one out!
    Alyssa @ The Devil Orders Takeout recently posted…Chinese Culture: The Myths of Nüwa and Houyi (Or, Coincidences and Shooting Stars)My Profile

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